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Rather than having to go through all the work of scrambling your novel, typing it in or combining all those files into one, I have a simpler solution. I've set up 50,001 words of Lorem Ipsum which is a dummy text that printers use. You can copy this text and then past it into the verification box. This will verify you as a winner and, once you've done that, you can just go back to manually updating your word count and your bar will stay purple. Obviously, this isn't for people who didn't write 50,000 words to pretend they won NaNoWriMo (Who would cheat on a self-challenge like this? What would be the point?) rather for those that legitimately wrote over 50,000 words but don't have them handy for easy copy and paste verification.
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A business rule is a rule of a business, company, or corporation. It is a rule that defines or constrains some aspect of business and always resolves to either true or false. Business rules are intended to assert business structure or to control or influence the behavior of the business.[1] Business rules describe the operations, definitions and constraints that apply to an organization. Business rules can apply to people, processes, corporate behavior and computing systems in an organization, and are put in place to help the organization achieve its goals.
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A range of psychological and communications theories have been used to explain how commercial sponsorship works to impact consumer audiences. Most use the notion that a brand (sponsor) and event (sponsoree) become linked in memory through the sponsorship and as a result, thinking of the brand can trigger event-linked associations, while thinking of the event can come to trigger brand-linked associations. Cornwell, Weeks and Roy (2005)[2] have published an extensive review of the theories so far used to explain commercial sponsorship effects. One of the most pervasive findings in sponsorship is that the best effects are achieved where there is a logical match between the sponsor and sponsoree, such as a sports brand sponsoring a sports event. Work by Cornwell and colleagues[3] however, has shown that brands that don't have a logical match can still benefit, at least in terms of memory effects, if the sponsors articulates some rationale for the sponsorship to the audience.
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A range of psychological and communications theories have been used to explain how commercial sponsorship works to impact consumer audiences. Most use the notion that a brand (sponsor) and event (sponsoree) become linked in memory through the sponsorship and as a result, thinking of the brand can trigger event-linked associations, while thinking of the event can come to trigger brand-linked associations. Cornwell, Weeks and Roy (2005)[2] have published an extensive review of the theories so far used to explain commercial sponsorship effects. One of the most pervasive findings in sponsorship is that the best effects are achieved where there is a logical match between the sponsor and sponsoree, such as a sports brand sponsoring a sports event. Work by Cornwell and colleagues[3] however, has shown that brands that don't have a logical match can still benefit, at least in terms of memory effects, if the sponsors articulates some rationale for the sponsorship to the audience.